2013 Mobility Trends

Posted on January 1, 2013 by

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Image courtesy of FrameAngel at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

I have to thank my chat partner Autom Tagsa for setting me up, I mean for calling this topic. Seriously, with the first #SMchat of the year the day after the holiday it really does make sense to talk about emerging trends.

Last chat Autom led us in a discussion to recap 2012, nice work Autom.

For this chat I suggest we focus on 5 topic areas. I’ll provide an overview for each. During the chat we will allot time for each topic so we have a chance to talk about each topic.

Perhaps we will delve deeper into specific areas of interest in future chats. Although I am selecting 5 topic areas you may want to suggest other areas, quite frankly there are other areas of interest so feel free to add ideas in the comments here or during the chat.

By the way these topics are not listed in any particular order.

Utilitarian Marketing

I read a recent article in the Harvard Business review by Mitch Joel on this topic. Mitch makes a number of interesting points in the article. As marketers we tend to think that consumers want to engage with our brands, and in some instances this is in fact the case. Think Harley Davidson for example.

Mitch’s example of a trip to the grocery store is an illustration most of us can understand. We don’t necessarily want a relationship with our supermarket we want to find our stuff quickly and conveniently.

Q1 What are some examples of utility marketing?

Q2 How can utility marketing provide a competitive advantage?

Influencing Consumer Behavior

I was listening to an interview with Daniel Pink about his new book To Sell is Human. Admittedly the book is not about mobility; however, he does make the observation that traditional marketing strategies have been based on information asymmetry. If you are participating in this chat or reading this post you realize this is no longer the case.

Because consumers are actively interacting with others for research, tips and advice the role of marketers is far more complex. Mobility requires a customer first focus. Marketers have used the customer first cliche for years, often it’s been more lip service than reality. Now the stakes are much higher, figuring out how to observe, listen, respond and adapt is essential. And the rate of change is staggering.

Q3 What are some ways mobility is driving behavior influence?

Q4 How will this influence affect consumer engagement?

Application Development

To build or not to build an application has been an ongoing debate. In the past application development has been a significant endeavor. One can argue that this is still the case for really good sophisticated apps. But lately I have seen some free tools that facilitate app creation.

Q6 What should guide the decision to consider an app?

Multi-screen behaviors

Hardly a day goes by that I don’t see a new study suggesting that mulit-screen behavior is now becoming increasingly common behavior. Consumers are constantly on the move, distracted, easily moving between media and platforms.

Q7 How does a marketer address this challenge?

SoMoLo Social/Mobile/Local

We had a chat on this topic last year. Increasingly major retailers like Walgreens and brands like Nike are leveraging the opportunity that is found at the intersection of these three disciplines. While a cursory glance at this topic may generate a shrug of the shoulders, there is something quite different about this growing trend. This particular trend offers a real opportunity for small businesses that are able to seize the opportunity.

Q8 How should marketers use this trend to their advantage?

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Posted in: Mobility, Trends